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Our postdoctoral fellow Amédé Gogovor and his colleagues publish an analysis on the challenges and solutions of integrating sex and gender considerations in knowledge translation

Our postdoctoral fellow Amédé Gogovor and his colleagues have published an analysis on the challenges and solutions of integrating sex and gender considerations in knowledge translation. Sex and gender considerations are essential elements of designing, implementing and reporting interventions. Integrating sex and gender ensures that there is more relevant evidence to translate (disseminate) into the real world.

Six projects under study


Canada has funding opportunities specifically for sex- and gender-inclusive knowledge translation projects. The article “Sex and gender analysis in knowledge translation interventions: challenges and solutions” looks at sex and gender can be integrated in six funded knowledge translation projects. In 2018, six research teams funded by the Institute of Gender and Health (IGH) met in Ottawa to discuss these challenges and solutions. Eighteen participants, including researchers, health professionals, fellows and IGH members, were divided into two groups. Two authors carried out qualitative coding and thematic analysis of the material discussed. Six themes emerged:

  1. consensus building
  2. orientation of the guides
  3. design and effectiveness of results
  4. documentary research and recruitment
  5. access and collection of data
  6. intersection with other determinants of health

In solution mode


Solutions that emerged from this exercise included:

  • educating stakeholders on the use of sex and gender concepts
  • triangulation of researcher and end-user perspectives
  • participation in organizations and committees to influence policy and practice


Unresolved challenges included difficulty integrating sex and gender considerations with patient-oriented research principles, a lack of gender-validated measurement tools and a lack of intersectionality experts.

The paper shares discussions on the findings obtained based on observations from similar initiatives elsewhere to advance the integration of sex and gender in translating research findings into health services.